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  • 10 September, 2012 - 10:55
    Any watch freaks out there? Time for some early Xmas shopping! http://t.co/kM5C8cyx
  • 25 July, 2012 - 10:14
    Have you kicked the tires on the Joomla 3 Alpha? If so, I'd love to know what you think.
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  • 17 July, 2012 - 16:18
    The Alpha release of the new Joomla! 3.0 is out now. The release is primarily intended for extension developers... http://t.co/eX31fk0o
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    My latest book is out: Joomla! Search Engine Optimization http://t.co/3lToGUhh #joomla #seo

Feed Roundup

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users' Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent users' data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent user's data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

Australian Police Use Telcos For Cell "Tower Dump" of All Connected Users Data

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:46
AHuxley (892839) writes The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13. AHuxley links to some U.S. views on the same kind of massive data grab: The Wall Street Journal says they caputure innocent user's data; the Chicago Police Department is being sued for information on its purchases of equipment associated with this kind of slurping; and the EFF asks whether warrant protection for users' data will be extended by voice-comm companies as it has been for ISPs. I wonder what people would think of an occasional "postal zone dump" employing the same kind of dragnet but for communications on paper.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

A Google-style hyper-scale data centre... but WITHOUT the Google

The Register - 8 July, 2014 - 20:33
At least that's the claim from new hyper converged upstart

Another startup has emerged on the hyperconverged system block: Austin-based NIMBOXX, which claims its customers can increase IO performance by up to 500 per cent.…

Categories: The Essentials

LG G Watch will be available in 27 countries

from News.com - 8 July, 2014 - 20:29
The Android Wear-powered smartwatch will be sold in the UK and Australia (among many other countries) at the Google Play Store and at retailers.






Categories: Open Source

YouTube gets injected with 12K live concert videos

from News.com - 8 July, 2014 - 20:26
The video-sharing site works with Music Vault to bring users thousands of remastered music videos, from The Grateful Dead to The Sex Pistols to Fleet Foxes.






Categories: Open Source

Universal Discredit: Gov admits Treasury HASN'T signed off biz case

The Register - 8 July, 2014 - 20:06
Iain Duncan Smith's welfare IT reform plan looks doomed

Iain Duncan Smith's Department for Work and Pensions scrambled to dismiss comments made by the government's head of the civil service late on Monday, after Sir Bob Kerslake told MPs that the Treasury had yet to make the business case for the widely derided Universal Credit programme.…

Categories: The Essentials

Blue Shield Leaks 18,000 Doctors' Social Security Numbers

Slashdot - 8 July, 2014 - 20:05
itwbennett (1594911) writes "The Social Security numbers of roughly 18,000 California physicians and health-care providers were inadvertently made public after a slip-up at health insurance provider Blue Shield of California, the organization said Monday. The numbers were included in monthly filings on medical providers that Blue Shield is required to make to the state's Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC). The provider rosters for February, March and April 2013 included the SSNs and other sensitive information and were available under the state's public records law." Ten copies were requested under the public records law.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: The Essentials

APX Labs snaps up Google's Glass for Work leader

from News.com - 8 July, 2014 - 20:00
The Internet-connected headset software platform maker has hired Eric Johnsen, the founder of the Glass for Work initiative at Google X.






Categories: Open Source

Intel, Samsung create Internet of Things group

from News.com - 8 July, 2014 - 19:54
Tech giants join forces to create the Open Interconnect Consortium, setting up a rivalry with a similarly minded, Linux-focused group.






Categories: Open Source

New Sony Xperia C3 is all about the selfie

from News.com - 8 July, 2014 - 19:53
The Sony Xperia C3 packs a 5-megapixel front-facing camera with a flash for feeding your selfie habit.






Categories: Open Source

'iPhone 6' survives FRENZIED STABBING. Truly, it is the JESUS Phone

The Register - 8 July, 2014 - 19:36
Or, this is just a very naughty boy

Vid A bloke on the internet has attempted to stab to bits what he describes as an Apple "iPhone 6" - but was stopped dead by the gizmo's frontispiece, perhaps fashioned of wondro-material "sapphire glass".…

Categories: The Essentials

<i>Reg</i> reader fires up Pi-powered anti-cat garden sprinkler system

The Register - 8 July, 2014 - 19:18
Crap in my begonias? Oh no you don't, you furry little sod

Vid

Categories: The Essentials
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